Free UK standard delivery over £45 | Pay in 3 with Klarna. Learn more

FEATURED

Film fund: Big Breasts Matter

A film that brings together tales about the challenges that come with having big breasts, Big Breasts Matter is a documentary by writer, producer and director Danielle Dash. Partly funded by Lush, Danielle speaks about the journey that led her to create this empowering and unifying documentary about women’s bodies. Premiering on the 23rd January at Lush Studio Soho, read on to hear about the film. 

I’ve had big breasts for as long as I can remember. With it has come many joys, but also many challenges. As a TV executive and cultural writer from London, I felt it important to make a film that spoke about people’s experiences living with larger bosoms. 

Making Big Breasts Matter was significant  to me because, from an early age, having big breasts made me feel physically awkward. My breasts drew unwanted attention from older boys and men, incapable of understanding the size of my breasts was not in correlation with my age. 

Aside from making me seem older than I was, my breasts made school sports a little more challenging and my sports bra couldn’t be bought in affordable highstreet retailers. By the time I was fourteen, I had G cup breasts, which meant taking a trip to a specialised shop for the kind of bra I needed to support them during activities. 

My mum would ask me if I wanted a breast reduction, but I knew that I liked my body and getting a reduction would in someway suggest that there was something wrong with having breasts as big as mine. While I’m encouraging of anyone who desires to have an area of their body surgically changed, I decided a long time ago that having big breasts was a part of me I wanted to keep. This choice meant I had to figure out how to navigate the world in the best way I could. 

Big Breasts Matter was born from a need to create a safe space for people with big breasts, where we could discuss the realities of managing big bosoms.

I was running for a train but the bra I was wearing was so ill-equipped for the task that both my breasts leapt out of their cups. Luckily I was wearing a bulky scarf and no one on my commute could see my breasts hanging free from their cages. All I could do was Tweet my frustration until I was able to pop my boobs back into my bra. I was so taken by how many people were affected by this issue and wanted to do something to tell our stories. I soon realised there was a need for this film.  

At first my energy was directed at the manufacturers of bras, holding them accountable for the high cost of bras for big breasts, but then I turned my attention to this  short documentary, realising it would be an effective platform to discuss these difficulties. I started by shooting a video with my friends and used it to crowdfund the film I actually wanted to make. 

The social media campaign around the video was successful and soon I had reached my goal. I set about interviewing women who’d volunteered to answer my questions and had a wonderful creative team around me. Bolu Babalola (writer and producer), Dorcas Magbadelo (illustrator and artist), Lauren Doughlin (filmmaker and storyteller), Seye Isikalu (filmmaker) and Funda Hassan (editor) worked to help bring my idea to life. 

Soon after filming the interviews which appear in the film, I landed my dream job and was pulled away from completing Big Breasts Matter. I’d filmed interviews with lingerie brands that didn’t make it into the final cut because I realised I needed to make women the centre of the film, and not an argument with brands that I wasn’t equipped to have. 

What I was equipped to do was let other women with big breasts know that they weren’t alone. I was equipped to create a safe space where we could be honest with one another about how fun it can be to have big breasts, but also affirm the struggles we go through. 

When I found out about the Lush Film Fund, I’d had some time to think more about what I wanted the final film to say. The extra time afforded me perspective and a renewed sense of purpose to get it made. I continued to collaborate with graphic artist Dorcas Magbadelo to create the illustrations that appear in the film, making sure they were representative of the different women that took the time to be interviewed. 

I was also able to work with actress Letitia Hector to develop inserts for the film that showed the aspects of having big breasts that the interviewees are discussing. Directed by Kevin Morosky, we were able to capture the spirit of the film. Finally, Funda Hassan, an editor I’ve worked with for years, helped to tie all these pieces together in a way that was exciting.

It’s taken me 4 years to make a film with a runtime of 16 minutes, but I’m finally happy for people to see the film. During this time I’ve learnt a lot about myself and the expectations of my work. I’ve made mistakes along the way, such as co-opting the “Black Lives Matter” slogan for the title of my film. Doing so undermined a movement designed to address institutional police brutality against black people, both in America and here in Britain. 

I realised I could make the same impact without standing on the shoulders of those doing important work to dismantle systems of oppression. This said, I’m proud of this film. Big Breasts Matter is only the beginning of a conversation that will hopefully help more people in the future.

Buy a ticket to the screening of the film at Lush Studio Soho on the 23rd of January by clicking here,or watch the film from the comfort of your own home once it’s premiered by visiting danielledash.com.    

 

Comment (1)
1 Comment

VixBeeBee_2

about 7 months ago

I would love to view this film. There does not appear to be anything on the website mentioned (danielledash.com) and a Google search doesn't hold any info either.